The auditory cortex of people with sensorineural hearing loss can be re-afferented using a cochlear implant (CI): a neural prosthesis that bypasses the damaged cells in the cochlea to stimulate directly the auditory nerve. Although CIs are the most successful neural prosthesis to date, some CI users still do not achieve satisfactory outcomes using these devices. To explain variability in outcomes, clinicians and researchers have increasingly focused their attention on neuroscientific investigations that examined how the auditory cortices respond to the electric signals that originate from the CI. This chapter provides an overview of the literature that examined how the auditory cortex changes its functional properties in response to inputs from the CI, in animal models and in humans. We focus first on the basic responses to sounds delivered through electrical hearing and, next, we examine the integrity of two fundamental functions of the auditory system: tonotopy and processing of binaural cues. When addressing the effects of CIs in humans we also consider speech-evoked responses. We conclude by discussing to what extent this neuroscientific literature can contribute to clinical practices and help to overcome variability in outcomes.

Neuroplasticity following cochlear implants. The Temporal Lobe, Chapter 5.

Davide Bottari
2022

Abstract

The auditory cortex of people with sensorineural hearing loss can be re-afferented using a cochlear implant (CI): a neural prosthesis that bypasses the damaged cells in the cochlea to stimulate directly the auditory nerve. Although CIs are the most successful neural prosthesis to date, some CI users still do not achieve satisfactory outcomes using these devices. To explain variability in outcomes, clinicians and researchers have increasingly focused their attention on neuroscientific investigations that examined how the auditory cortices respond to the electric signals that originate from the CI. This chapter provides an overview of the literature that examined how the auditory cortex changes its functional properties in response to inputs from the CI, in animal models and in humans. We focus first on the basic responses to sounds delivered through electrical hearing and, next, we examine the integrity of two fundamental functions of the auditory system: tonotopy and processing of binaural cues. When addressing the effects of CIs in humans we also consider speech-evoked responses. We conclude by discussing to what extent this neuroscientific literature can contribute to clinical practices and help to overcome variability in outcomes.
Auditory cortex, Cochlear implants, Deafness, Sensitive Periods, Speech
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11771/20077
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